Year: 2013

Reading on the Incarnation

Working through our Coming of God series for Advent, I’ve been reading a number of books on the incarnation. Two books, in particular, have been scintillating, along with an essay by Princeton theologian Robert Jensen.

Man Christ Jesus: Theological Reflections on the Humanity of Christ (Bruce Ware)

This short, accessible book has a lovely cover design and thought provoking reflections on incarnation. I found chapter two, on the role of the Spirit in the life of Christ, especially enjoyable. While some points are debatable, it is a helpful read.

God Who Became Human: a Biblical Theology of Incarnation (Cole Graham)

This is the 30th installment in a fantastic series of books–New Studies in Biblical Theology–edited by D.A. Carson. The scholarship in this series is always top notch and clear. Cole’s prior contribution, God the Peacemaker, was also a delight to read. These books let the Bible sing by tracing its major themes through inter-textual connections within the larger narrative of Scripture. They also frequently provide helpful theological and practical reflection.

Nicene Christianity: The Future for a New Ecumenism (ed. Christoper Seitz)

The is a great collection of essays that reflect on the Nicene Creed. Robert Jensen is in top form reflecting theologically and creatively upon the phrase “for us…he was made man.” Some superb insights and stirring reflection on the nature of Christ’s humanity and the present state of heaven.

Did God Really Become a Baby?

Advent season offers a unique opportunity to reflect on one of the most fascinating claims about Jesus–his incarnation. Depending on your vantage point, the incarnation may sound like a fantastic fairy tale, a mind-blowing reality, a comforting truth, or uninteresting doctrine. I find it both outlandish and profound.

God becoming a baby? Really? How absurd. What would compel God to do that? How is it possible? And if he did come, why not come as an adult and skip the awkward baby stage? Many non-Christians find this claim absurd, while many non-Christians take it for granted, which is why I’m taking four Sundays to consider the incarnation from a skeptical and theological perspective. Here’s an introductory video:

Advent 2013 – The Coming of God from City Life Church on Vimeo.

Sermons and manuscripts can be found here.

Say Something Worth Believing (New Book in 2014) + Coverart

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Too many people find the gospel unbelievable because of the incredible ways we communicate it:

  • Name-dropping Jesus at work to feel good about your Christian duty
  • Arguing about political issues as essentially Christian
  • Recruiting people to your church and not to Jesus
  • Regurgitating information about the death of a first century Jewish messiah without taking the time to love and know others.

Our gospel communication is often dry doctrinal communication, devout of love or any real understanding about a person, how the gospel would be good news in their bad news. This, in part, is why people find the gospel so unbelievable,

In this 200+ page book, I’m taking on the whole gospel communication enterprise. Pray for me! I am exposing unbelievable evangelistic methods, unbiblical motivations, and unfaithful gospel messages. Then, charting a winsome, wise, and culturally discerning way forward in gospel communication.